Creating a Culture of Respect in the Workplace

Whether your business is a restaurant or retail store or even an office, there needs to be an established culture of respect. So, what does respect mean to your business culture (regardless of the type of business you run)?

What is culture? It is the customs, arts, social institutions and achievements of a particular nation, people or other social groups. And, what is respect? It is a feeling of deep admiration for someone or something elicited by their abilities, qualities or achievements. Now that we have those, let’s put them together.

What is a culture of respect, especially when it comes to your business? A culture of respect is when your business or organization feels admiration for the achievements of someone such as an employee, a volunteer or any member of your team.

When people respect you as a person, they admire you. When they respect you as a friend, they love you. When they respect you as a leader, they follow you.”

John C. Maxwell, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You
Creating a culture of respect for your business well keep customers coming back.

Creating Respect

Without respect, businesses wouldn’t get anywhere. There are many examples in the world where people go to companies and have a terrible experience because they didn’t get the quality of service they wanted. This happens in restaurants because servers are having a bad day and don’t give the attention that a customer should deserve. It can occur as a customer service rep in a retail establishment for the same reason.

Name Tags and a Culture of Respect

So, how does a culture of respect pertain to name tags? How do name tags help you respect someone who does well at their job? Is it because you know their name, or is it because the idea of a uniform has influenced us?

Logo name tags can help your business create a culture of respect for both employees and customers.

No matter your view on name tags, certain informational aspects answer these questions. We’ve all been influenced by the idea of a uniform; it keeps us connected with employees of a business. Part of this uniform can sometimes be a name tag. Name tags help keep both the customer and the employee respectful toward each other. Let’s take one element at a time.

First, the logo or company name.

People associate the company logo and employees with the organization when employees wear logo name tags at conventions and trade shows. Another benefit to having a logo is that employees tend to keep their name tags on when they go on their lunch break or commute to and from work. By doing so, they advertise the company to the public and make the brand more memorable.

Second, the person’s name.

We all want to be recognized as individuals, and wearing a name tag helps with that goal. Whether the tag is for a business venture or a personal one, your name should be the thing that catches someone’s eye. And, by having your name visible to others, especially those who might not know you, you become more approachable, and in turn, more trustworthy.

People who respect each other help each other. They support each other as employees and as people. Not only does this mean that employees will have richer, more positive relationships at work but also when there is a culture of support, employees won’t be afraid to ask for help. This ultimately makes everyone more comfortable and effective in his or her job.

Third, the person’s title.

This title can vary from anything such as cashier to customer service agent and even store manager. Even designer and marketing or sales titles help customers, clientele and other employees understand the type of service and answers they can get from specific people. These answers then become how these individuals can measure the respect they will receive from the business.

Respect in the Workplace

Creating this culture takes many steps, one of which is paying attention to the ladder of succession. Respect comes from the way employers treat employees. Customers can pick up on if a boss does not treat his employees with respect. If a boss doesn’t respect the employee, then that employee will not treat the customers with respect. Then, in the long run, the customers will not respect the business.

One of the biggest problems that businesses face is keeping the culture of respect open to customers. As a business, you should have a level of respect for each customer to respect your business. Other things that will help a company earn the respect of their customers and employees is having proper signage around the office or store. This can include any needed name plates and identification for everyone who works for the business, even if they are volunteers.

Respect is the glue for strong, lasting relationships. It’s an ingredient to grow self-worth and confidence in your employees. Confident employees, in turn, are pro-active and innovative, actively participating in growing the company, and therefore, also your profits. Respect is what empowers people and breed a culture of continuous improvement. And the culture of continuous improvement, promises longevity and success, something that every company aspires to.

So, how does your company define culture of respect?

Remember that this respect goes both ways. If anyone is missing respect, then the rest of them will eventually be missing this respect. Developing and maintaining a culture of respect doesn’t have to be tricky. It is merely recognizing that customers deserve respect and that you deserve respect as a business owner.

No matter what, always remember that to earn respect, you must return it. And don’t forget the name tag! Remember that they give off an air of respect by simply making them part of a uniform for your company.

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